Steroid Injections

Keloids are thick, rounded, irregular clusters of scar tissue that grow at the site of a wound on the skin, but beyond the edges of the borders of the wound. They often appear red or darker in color, as compared to the surrounding normal skin. Keloids are formed from collagen that the body produces after a wound has healed. These scars may appear anywhere on the body. They occur more often in darker-skinned people. Keloid scars may occur up to 1 year after the original trauma to the skin.

Steroid injections are often used in combination with other types of treatment, including surgery. The shots are given before or after the other treatment, depending on the type. With cryotherapy they are given first to soften the scar tissue and make it more receptive to the cryotherapy, while with surgery the shots are given afterwards. Some experts advise that steroid injections not be given until after sutures are removed to avoid risk of reopening the wound.

How does it work?

The steroid is injected into the bulkiest part of the keloid at an angle. The needle will be inserted inside the scar tissue at tiny spaced intervals to spread the steroid throughout the scar. Corticosteroids reduce the production of collagen and proteins that form fibrous scar tissue as well as inhibit inflammatory factors. This activity causes keloids to soften and become flatter.